Despite the fact this may not be possibl…

Despite the fact this may not be possible to implement in a K-12 model, I find this market to be a very interesting model when it comes to addressing the issue of student debt. I feel that it is important to clarify that while it is partially true that “everything is free”, the school enters into an income-sharing contract with students, binding them to an agreement that simply allows students to pay the tuition once they obtain a paying job. So essentially it’s “everything is free… until it’s not”. Regardless – the idea of success-driven learning, and income-sharing agreements is one that I find fascinating in terms of relieving the stress of student debt. When comparing ISA’s to the conventional student loan, I feel that ISAs offer more flexibility primarily because they ensure the student can afford it. With a standard student loan, the nominal monthly fee is fixed and therefore potentially hard to manage considering a student’s current financial position, whereas the ISA is flexible and ensures that students will be able to afford it regardless of current circumstances.